[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index] [List Home]
Re: [ide-dev] "Typing with pleasure"



On 24 April 2016 at 17:27, Doug Schaefer <cdtdoug@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:
On Sat, Apr 23, 2016 at 2:29 PM, Cole Markham <cole@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Based on the post I read on the IDEA zero-latency implementation, it seems it only applies to the first keypress. Further, the testing tool used for these results is specifically designed to measure the optimization that the zero-latency mode uses. The tool does support rapid keypress testing, but I don't think it was used for this article. I think it was skewed to make the zero-latency mode look like the winner, but that's just a hunch. In either case, independent results with more real world conditions would answer some of these questions.

Interesting. It is certainly an area we should investigate. The use case I would think users really care about is when they're in the midst of writing a bunch of code and are touch typing, watching what they're typing on the screen. First keypress isn't really a driving issue.



To be clear, in case someone who hasn't read the article misunderstands, "first keypress" doesn't mean first keypress in an entire editor session, it means first keypress in a series of keypresses all occurring within a very small interval of each other. Quoting from the IDEA zero-latency article:

"This should be enough to significantly improve the editor latency. Keep in mind though, that if subsequentÂblocking or repainting takes more time than a period until the next key is pressed, a typing lag is still possible."

https://blog.jetbrains.com/idea/2015/08/experimental-zero-latency-typing-in-intellij-idea-15-eap/

So yes, the benchmarks results are skewed to favor the first keystroke only (and thus favor IntelliJ), but the article also says they are working on a way to solve the latency problem for all keypresses (by avoiding how they currently do locks on their document model).

--